A Guide to the Inserts Found in Crissy Family Boxes

Let's begin with the items found in the larger dolls' boxes.

Below: These are the paper inserts for 1969 and 1970 dolls (hair to floor orange lace dress, hair to hips orange lace dress, and turquoise sateen dress).

Crissy & Beth

Crissy & Beth

(Left) Here is the back of the direction sheet shown above. If the collector finds a doll with gummy hair that won't come clean, direction #4 is the reason why. Baby oil is a petroleum based product that does not age well. It binds to the "hair" fibers permanently and is definitely not recommended on vintage dolls.

This particular illustration shows up on nearly every Crissy family doll's instruction sheet, as the reader shall see below and on page two. Ideal did, however, change the name of the doll as necessary on each sheet.




























Crissy & Beth

(Left)This is the inside of the "Letter to Mother." This letter came with quite a few of the very early Crissy & Velvet dolls. When the letter was included with Velvet, they noted her name on the upper right hand corner (as seen on page two).





























(Below)Here is the back of the small booklet that came in the early Crissy boxes, showing six of the first outfits boxed and sold for Crissy. As one scrolls down the page, several hairstyles are presented with tips for setting Crissy's hair.

This booklet was in the box with both 1969 issues and until Ideal ran out of them; they can be found in the 1970 & 1971 issues as well. So to recap, 1969 & 1970 dolls will have the "Letter to Mother," the instruction sheet, and this hairstyle booklet. I am frequently asked why sometimes not all inserts can be found in the box. Well, Mom probably took the letter and instructions to read, the little hairstylist probably used the booklet in hair play. Knowing how little ones like to remove shoes, clothes and underwear, it shouldn't be surprising that these "disposable" paper items sometimes didn't make it back into the box. Generally speaking, unless a doll is drop-dead mint with all original wrappings, including tissue or the "body baggie," these paper items didn't make it back into the box once play commenced.

Crissy & Beth

Crissy & Beth

Crissy & Beth

Crissy & Beth

Crissy & Beth

Crissy & Beth

Crissy & Beth

Crissy & Beth

(Below) Here are the two booklets that were included in the 1971 issue, Movin' Groovin' Crissy.

Crissy & Beth

(Below) This is the illustrations found on the back of the booklets.

Crissy & Beth

Going forward, we'll take a moment to examine the inside pages of the hairstyle booklet sold with the MG Crissy. Curiously, Ideal illustrated several of the outfits that they had created for Crissy in 1971, even suggesting a coordinating hairstyle. However, they didn't use the actual names that they gave the outfits (with the exception of Grape Drape). They used Velvet's outfits names, as the reader will see as they continue to study this and the next page.

Crissy & Beth

Crissy & Beth

Crissy & Beth

Crissy & Beth

Crissy & Beth

(Below) Here are the inside contents of the other 1971 booklet. This was an advertising piece, giving the buyer a peek at 1971 issue clothing, accessories and other items available during that year.

Crissy & Beth

Crissy & Beth

Crissy & Beth

Crissy & Beth

Crissy & Beth

Crissy & Beth

Crissy & Beth

(Below) Now presented are the inserts for the Look Around Crissy doll. This instruction page is exactly the same for the Look Around Velvet doll (as noted further on the next page of this document). The "Letter to Mother" changed in style from 1972 forward. This collector has always referred to it as the "Lionel Weintraub letter."

Lionel Weintraub (1920-1994) served as president of Ideal Toy Corporation from 1962-1982. He also was the Toy Industry Association, Inc. Board Chairman in 1968, and was responsible for drafting the standards for television advertising directed to children. His legacy is still keenly felt among members of the toy industry. He had the unique ability to recognize genius in several toy inventors. Great products resulted that are highly collectible today. He, in the opinion of several people in both the industry and in the collectibles world, represents some of the most influential talent ever presented on the toy industry "playing" field.

Crissy & Beth

(Below) This is the back of the letter, which combines both Mr. Weintraub's comments to "Mother" but also "special instructions for special hair care for all the 'Beautiful Hair-Growing Dolls' from Ideal."

Crissy & Beth

(Below) Here is the inside of the letter. One notes that Ideal used previously published graphics and directions from the 1969 instructions, though this is copyrighted 1972.

Crissy & Beth

It seems that Ideal chose to generasize their instructions so that this letter could be included with all of their hair-growing dolls from 1972 forward, thus the verbiage "for all the 'Beautiful Hair-Growing Dolls' from Ideal."

Below, two pictures: Here is the inside of the smaller brochure, as pictured above, that went with Look Around Crissy, with the inside demonstrating 1 through 4 and style 5 on the back.

Crissy & Beth

Crissy & Beth

(Below) The 1972 version of the paperwork that goes to that year's Talky Crissy. The 1971 version is not shown. However, it is very similar to the paperwork below for the 1971 version of Talky Velvet. The only difference is that instead of saying "Talky Velvet," it says "Talky Crissy." See page two.

Included in the 1972 version (this doll came in the picture box as seen on the main page of this site) are repair instructions. They let the consumer know where to send the doll for repairs. The opinion among collectors today is that the doll simply was replaced instead of repaired. Ideal also included their 1971 booklet (description above) until they ran out of them.

The directions for the 1971 and the 1972 versions of the Talky Crissy dolls were copyrighted 1971 and 1972, respectively.

Crissy & Beth

(Below) Here is the back of the instructions for the 1972 Talky Crissy, again, with the usual graphics resurrected from previous years.

Crissy & Beth

(Below) Now we move into the year 1973. These inserts include directions on how to use the "Swirla Curler" as well as the Weintraub letter/direction sheet.

Crissy & Beth

(Below) Here is the back of the directions, demonstrating styles created with the Swirla Curler.

Crissy & Beth

1974 welcomed the release of the 'Beautiful Crissy with Twirly Beads' doll. Below are the directions for using the Twirly Beads device. There is nothing on the back of this page.

Crissy & Beth

Crissy & Beth

Here are Kerry's instructions. The graphics and verbiage are very similar to previous issue directions for Crissy. The back of the directions were the same too, though they changed the name "Crissy" to "Kerry" (see below).

































Crissy & Beth

(Below) As one scrolls through this page and page two, it is noted that both Tressy and Cricket's (Sears catalog exclusives) have directions that are very nearly identical. The graphics are the same for both dolls, though the verbiage has changed somewhat. The direction sheet for both Gorgeous Tressy and Posin' Tressy are the same, so only one is being shown. There is nothing on the back of this sheet.

Crissy & Beth

Crissy & Beth

Brandi's directions. The directions and graphics are the same as the usual.



































Here is the back of the directions for Brandi, where everything is the same as most of the early Crissy issues as well as Kerry's directions, though Brandi's name is used.

Crissy & Beth

Now let's look at the directions and box inserts for the smaller girls in the Crissy family collection and for Baby Crissy. (Click on the link.)

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August, 2007, by Beth-Ellen Colvin